Government auctions are a great way to snag a retiring cop cruiser on the cheap, and being owned and run by the feds, you better believe it’s going to have records of every oil change, spark plug, and water pump that went into the damn thing. Nevertheless, it’s always best to remain objective, because even though it’s being sold by the United States government, that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been thrashed. The competition at these things can also be pretty fierce at times (cab companies love old Crown Vics), so if cop cruisers and confiscated drug trafficking cars aren’t your thing, there are probably other options out there for you, like public auctions.
No, I was not referencing salvage auctions. Local auto auctions are extremely tricky, and I would never recommend them as a thrift-shopping device to anyone by an expert. I work for several dealerships, and each and everyone one sends cars to auctions ONLY if they think they would do the dealerships’ reputation harm. I’m glad you think you got a great deal and I really hope you’re one of the exceptions, but I would proceed very carefully with the new car, and I would take it to the best mechanic you can find immediately.
Log onto PropertyRoom.com, a Web site which auctions stolen property that law enforcement agencies were unable to return to the rightful owner. The auction is run much like eBay, and its product mix is arguably just as eclectic. Thanks to the criminal mind, the inventory, unfortunately, is endless. Stereos, guitars, laptops, jewelry, bicycles and designer clothes are all available for a fraction of the original value.
If you're looking for a good deal, you'll find it at online auction websites. Cars, jewelry, clothing, books, homes, and land are all available at bargain prices at these bidding sites with their amazing variety and choice. Collectors — from Star Wars to Disney — will also appreciate these websites, because frequenting them is a great way to increase your collection without breaking the bank.
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