It depends on how many properties you are planning to buy. If you wish to bid on all but purchase only one, than you need only one deposit check (generally the properties will be sold in the order they have been listed on the website and flyer.) If you are planning on buying more than one property, you will need a separate deposit check for each one.

Locating your nearest public car auction locations might be a question of doing some real detective work. They are usually hidden away in web searches because they are unaware of search engine optimization keywords which can get them onto the front page. You can try a search at specific sites which you know to be for repo, government car sales or police auctions. You will have to register your interest prior to the sale and you will be given a bidder number. All auctions work on similar principles, but each have their own way of doing things. You may also be asked for other personal details and will have to show proof of ID when you attend. Do some investigating before you attend. They may be able to send you an information pack and will usually have some tips for first time attendees.

Visit websites of government agencies that hold public auctions. At the federal level, you can find auctions online or listings for live auctions held across the country by visiting the GovSales.gov website. GovSales.gov has consolidated listings of assets for sale across the federal government. A variety of state and local government agencies also hold public surplus property auctions. Links to many local government auction sites are listed at USA.gov, under Shopping.


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Lot: 1 - ST. LOUIS CARDINALS MULTI-SIGNED HALL OF FAMERS ST. LOUIS CARDINALS MULTI-SIGNED HALL OF FAMERS HOME PLATE WITH PITCHING RUBBER Home plate signed by 7 St. Louis Cardinal HOFers including Jack Buck ('87), Stan Musial ('69), Bob Gibson ('81), Enos Slaughter ('85), Lou Brock ('85), Red Schoendienst Lot: 2 - CHRIS CARPENTER ST. LOUIS CARDINALS SIGNED 2006 CHRIS CARPENTER ST.   [ View Full Listing ]
Find an auction that sells newer cars where the public is allowed to attend. Most auto auctions are run for dealers only, but some are open to the public. Vehicles at an auction are generally ex-rentals, off-lease, repossessions, or government vehicles. Mine was a trade-in being sold by a dealership. A quick google search for “your area or city + public + auto auction” should do the trick to find an auction in your area.

As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
Cars at government and public auctions sell on visual inspection alone. So look at everything and look for telltale signs of repairs such as paint overspray, less than smooth sheet metal, puddles under the vehicle, scored brake discs, an uneven stance and a million other details. Use your nose, hands and legs, too. If a car smells musty or the carpeting is wet, run away.

A well-maintained car will always have a clean dipstick when you check the oil or transmission fluid, so if it’s anything other than light and transparent, be careful. Also be sure to inspect the coolant overflow tank and shine a flashlight inside the radiator. If it looks like someone accidentally dumped chocolate milk in there it’s time to walk away, because that’s the sign of a blown head gasket.
Any dispute arising as to any bidding shall be settled by Auctioneer at his sole discretion, and Auctioneer may put the lot in dispute up for sale again. Auctioneer reserves the right to refuse any bid, which it considers to be an insignificant advance over the preceding bid. No person shall bid on any lot of which he is the Consignor, agent, associate, or on behalf of the Consignor.
Always take a photo of the vehicle identification number (VIN) toward the base of the windshield on cars you want to bid on at auctions. After that, walk around and check places like door jams, under the hood, and inside trunk lids, where stickers with this number may also appear. If the numbers don’t match up, or are missing entirely it’s best to move on, because there’s probably a really bad reason why it’s like that.
Immediately after the bidding, the high bidder will be required to provide their deposit check as the initial earnest money deposit on the property. In most cases, the second high bidder (back-up bidder) will also be required to make a deposit. If you are not the high bidder or second high bidder, we do not collect your deposit.  The Terms of Sale will explain deposit requirements for each property. This deposit is non-refundable. Personal or business checks, money orders, cash, credit cards, bank letters, or letters of credit will not be accepted.

This is about auctions where the cars are the most ordinary of ordinary vehicles: Ford Crown Victorias coming off six years of patrol duty with the county sheriff's department. Toyota Tercels with so much mileage that their odometers have worn off the printed numerals. Plain sedans, base model pickups and early '90s Pontiac Firebirds confiscated in drug stings. Cars you can get cheap—maybe.


Identify contractors authorized to hold government auctions. You can obtain auction listings directly from contractors authorized by many government agencies to carry out public auctions. For example, one of the largest online public auction contractors for Federal, state and local government agencies is Bid4Assets, which auctions off surplus property, seized and tax-forfeited assets.

Easy Payment: Pay manually or use Auto Pay! Manual payment allows you to choose which card you want to use on every transaction. Auto Pay is set up through your account details. By keeping a valid payment method on file, your auctions will be processed automatically so that you never miss a payment! Special discounts are available to customers choosing Auto Pay.
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