Check out the vehicles at the auction house. There should be a pre-viewing session for the auction the day before. At the pre-viewing, you can start the vehicle but you can't test drive it. (Although my son did accidentally put a car in drive and move it a few inches. He was so embarrassed, he thought they were going to kick him out.) Do all the things you ordinarily would when buying a used car: check underneath for fluid spills, pop the hood, bring a friend that knows more about cars than you do.


The bidding started out fairly tame. Individuals there bought a beat up Impala for $525, a Chevy Astro van for $425, and the shittiest Chrysler PT Cruiser I have ever seen for $300. As for the awesome Ford Escort wagon? Well, it didn’t do so hot, in part, Kevin told me, because it’s so light and has low scrap value, and because parts are in low demand:
Visit websites of government agencies that hold public auctions. At the federal level, you can find auctions online or listings for live auctions held across the country by visiting the GovSales.gov website. GovSales.gov has consolidated listings of assets for sale across the federal government. A variety of state and local government agencies also hold public surplus property auctions. Links to many local government auction sites are listed at USA.gov, under Shopping.

What items are available for sale - You can expect to find various items at police auctions. This could be clothing, jewelry, electronics, art work, cameras, computers, tools, watches, furniture and many other items. You can also purchase vehicles at police auctions, as well as boats and even airplanes. The seized vehicles that are used in committing crimes are placed for sale where minimum bids and reserved prices are extremely rare. This means that you would be able to get these items even if your bids are low and nobody else is bidding against you.

The bidding started out fairly tame. Individuals there bought a beat up Impala for $525, a Chevy Astro van for $425, and the shittiest Chrysler PT Cruiser I have ever seen for $300. As for the awesome Ford Escort wagon? Well, it didn’t do so hot, in part, Kevin told me, because it’s so light and has low scrap value, and because parts are in low demand:
Cars at government and public auctions sell on visual inspection alone. So look at everything and look for telltale signs of repairs such as paint overspray, less than smooth sheet metal, puddles under the vehicle, scored brake discs, an uneven stance and a million other details. Use your nose, hands and legs, too. If a car smells musty or the carpeting is wet, run away.
Government auctions are a great way to snag a retiring cop cruiser on the cheap, and being owned and run by the feds, you better believe it’s going to have records of every oil change, spark plug, and water pump that went into the damn thing. Nevertheless, it’s always best to remain objective, because even though it’s being sold by the United States government, that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been thrashed. The competition at these things can also be pretty fierce at times (cab companies love old Crown Vics), so if cop cruisers and confiscated drug trafficking cars aren’t your thing, there are probably other options out there for you, like public auctions.
As an auctioneer I can tell you from a lot of experience that everybody on this site should be looking for and attending local auctions. The people who make a living buy at our auctions and resaleing on ebay or other means is truely amazing. One retired person built a 20 by 30 shed and did a garage sale ones a month and never did less then a $1000 and many time he told me he made 2 to 3 thousand on one day a month. He would purchase the piles of stuff we could not sale and sort through it and clean it up. We have purchase almost all of our furniture at auctions and most of it people who come over think it is brand new. Furniture is not selling very well because young people go to walmart or other stores and pay full price.
Agree with you. One bidder can not win an auction, because it is equal to the starting price. That’s why the cars must be posted to such auctions which has more potential clients or even partners. Car-Liquidation is an Auto Auction Association who helps sellers to gather bidders from all over the USA. So if one bidder will be from one state, from the other state will for sure appear another one. Because they have 1000s of auction partners and they share the sellers cars between them. So an auction car will be sold faster.
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Cars at government and public auctions sell on visual inspection alone. So look at everything and look for telltale signs of repairs such as paint overspray, less than smooth sheet metal, puddles under the vehicle, scored brake discs, an uneven stance and a million other details. Use your nose, hands and legs, too. If a car smells musty or the carpeting is wet, run away.
Ideally, go to one or two auctions just to get a feel for how the bidding goes. Usually they'll start off with a fairly high number stated by the auctioneer. Do not jump in then. In my case, nobody was putting out the first bid for a couple of minutes — which felt like hours — and the auctioneer finally asked for a starting bid. I put out $5,000 to start. In hindsight, I wish I hadn't because it seems like the first one to open their mouths always loses. But if there's no starting bid, the auctioneer will let the vehicle go without bidding since they're moving through these vehicles at a rate of about 15 per hour. I didn't want to lose this baby.
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If it looks too good to be true, chances are it is, and there’s a simple reason why. While bodywork is expensive, it pales in comparison to the kind of profit a car will turn if a high-bidding buyer doesn’t notice it. A thorough pre-bid inspection should hopefully illuminate any issues prior to putting down your money. For more info on what shoddy bodywork can hide, don’t forget to read our write-up on nine ways you can tell if a car has been in a wreck.
The purchaser shall pay a non-refundable deposit of 25% of the purchased price of any auction lot on the date of the auction, with the balance of the purchase price paid within 3 days following the auction. All payments must be received by cashier’s check, money order, company or personal check accompanied by an irrevocable bank letter of guarantee, or wire transfer payable to Bar None Auction. Any payment other than cash may be subject to an additional 3% administrative fee.

PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Monday, March 18th at 11:07 am  Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Friday, March 15th 10am to 4pm REMOVAL:   [ View Full Listing ]
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