As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
If a dealership sends a car to auction, it’s because they decided the necessary repairs needed to make it “dealer-standard” were too expensive-often the car will looks outstanding and pass a visual inspection, and then when you get it home, you’ll find out it had a bent frame or some other major repair which can make the car quite dangerous. Dealers are in the business of making money, and if they think the car wasn’t good enough to sell, why on earth would you think it was a good bet? There’s a reason these cars go for half price at auction.
The General Service Administration is the biggest national sales agency and you can check out fleet sale cars and trucks on their website. Online versions of the auction can be located through the GovSales website. Finding former police cars for sale is down to how often those local auctions are held, but you can also try eBay Motors. Government car auctions are there in the motors section for you to search through. You can search by ZIP code, type of car, miles from your destination or make and model of the car you require.
If you're looking for a good deal, you'll find it at online auction websites. Cars, jewelry, clothing, books, homes, and land are all available at bargain prices at these bidding sites with their amazing variety and choice. Collectors — from Star Wars to Disney — will also appreciate these websites, because frequenting them is a great way to increase your collection without breaking the bank.
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