The purchaser shall pay a non-refundable deposit of 25% of the purchased price of any auction lot on the date of the auction, with the balance of the purchase price paid within 3 days following the auction. All payments must be received by cashier’s check, money order, company or personal check accompanied by an irrevocable bank letter of guarantee, or wire transfer payable to Bar None Auction. Any payment other than cash may be subject to an additional 3% administrative fee.
You can find some information online, on government websites which will let you search your area for a particular vehicle. These sites are not limited to cars, either. You can find SUVs, trucks and motorcycles on many of them too. Doing a ZIP code search and choosing a specific model will show you all the vehicles within a certain distance from you. Police specific auctions can be found by other websites like gov-auctions, which tells you when and where the local auctions will take place.
Treasury Department Auctions:  The other agency very active in holding auctions is the Treasury Department, with roughly 300 sales per year. Treasury often offers in-person previews in California, Florida, New Jersey and Texas. Treasury auctions off "property forfeited as a result of violations of federal law enforced by the Department of Treasury or nonpayment of Internal Revenue Service taxes," according to its website. There are many categories of goods, including concrete items like antiques and coins but also less tangible property like stocks and patents.

To bid, you'll mostly need to go to an auction house on the day and bid in person. However, some auction houses now offer live internet or telephone bidding. You'll have to register to bid with the auction house, whether you're bidding in person or not. You should be able to find out when the next police auction will be held by visiting the auction house's website.
What items are available for sale - You can expect to find various items at police auctions. This could be clothing, jewelry, electronics, art work, cameras, computers, tools, watches, furniture and many other items. You can also purchase vehicles at police auctions, as well as boats and even airplanes. The seized vehicles that are used in committing crimes are placed for sale where minimum bids and reserved prices are extremely rare. This means that you would be able to get these items even if your bids are low and nobody else is bidding against you.

Government auctions are a great way to snag a retiring cop cruiser on the cheap, and being owned and run by the feds, you better believe it’s going to have records of every oil change, spark plug, and water pump that went into the damn thing. Nevertheless, it’s always best to remain objective, because even though it’s being sold by the United States government, that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been thrashed. The competition at these things can also be pretty fierce at times (cab companies love old Crown Vics), so if cop cruisers and confiscated drug trafficking cars aren’t your thing, there are probably other options out there for you, like public auctions.


If a dealership sends a car to auction, it’s because they decided the necessary repairs needed to make it “dealer-standard” were too expensive-often the car will looks outstanding and pass a visual inspection, and then when you get it home, you’ll find out it had a bent frame or some other major repair which can make the car quite dangerous. Dealers are in the business of making money, and if they think the car wasn’t good enough to sell, why on earth would you think it was a good bet? There’s a reason these cars go for half price at auction.
We are a premier full-service private auction company liquidating property seized by police and federal agencies, property from abandoned safe deposit boxes, seized bank assets, bankruptcies, financial institutions, business inventory liquidations, and other consignors. Our firm conducts traditional live auctions throughout the year at various locations across the country, as well as auctions on the Internet. Please see our schedule of upcoming auctions for further details.
Depending on the agency, the government may use revenue from auctioned items to support crime-prevention programs, pay restitution to crime victims or purchase new equipment the department needs. "By providing agencies with the ability to dispose of excess assets, GSA benefits taxpayers by eliminating the need to maintain and store the unneeded property while also raising more than $300 million in revenue in just the last two years," a GSA spokesperson said.
ONLINE ONLY GALLERY AUCTION Vintage & Modern Die Cast Toy Collection Bidding is open now Bidding Starts Ending Wednesday, March 13th 7:00 pm CentralTo Enter Auction Click Here! THIS ONLINE ONLY AUCTION Held at our auction gallery 421 E Stevenson Rd Ottawa IL 61350 Preview at the gallery Wednesday March 13th 10:00 am-4:00 pm Pick up dates Thursday   [ View Full Listing ]
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