Ideally, go to one or two auctions just to get a feel for how the bidding goes. Usually they'll start off with a fairly high number stated by the auctioneer. Do not jump in then. In my case, nobody was putting out the first bid for a couple of minutes — which felt like hours — and the auctioneer finally asked for a starting bid. I put out $5,000 to start. In hindsight, I wish I hadn't because it seems like the first one to open their mouths always loses. But if there's no starting bid, the auctioneer will let the vehicle go without bidding since they're moving through these vehicles at a rate of about 15 per hour. I didn't want to lose this baby.
A well-maintained car will always have a clean dipstick when you check the oil or transmission fluid, so if it’s anything other than light and transparent, be careful. Also be sure to inspect the coolant overflow tank and shine a flashlight inside the radiator. If it looks like someone accidentally dumped chocolate milk in there it’s time to walk away, because that’s the sign of a blown head gasket.

The majority of the vehicles found at local auctions will need some work done to them in order to be deemed “road-worthy.” Knowing this before you ever set foot on the grounds is a major part of deciding if this is the right way for you to source an automobile. A low bid on a crappy car has the potential to leave you stranded on the side of the road, so if you aren’t a savvy DIY wrencher, you’d better have one hell of a trustworthy mechanic.


If you're looking for a good deal, you'll find it at online auction websites. Cars, jewelry, clothing, books, homes, and land are all available at bargain prices at these bidding sites with their amazing variety and choice. Collectors — from Star Wars to Disney — will also appreciate these websites, because frequenting them is a great way to increase your collection without breaking the bank.
×