GovDeals is the official portal to government auctions, which range from land to computers to cars. The site's categories include surplus and confiscated items from various government agencies. The rules and regulations vary depending on the participating agency, and you deal directly with the agency after you are awarded your bid. The deals are great, but be sure to inquire about packaging and shipping of an item before you place your bid because most sellers do not ship, pack or palletize. You may be responsible for picking it up or paying someone to transport it.

The majority of the vehicles found at local auctions will need some work done to them in order to be deemed “road-worthy.” Knowing this before you ever set foot on the grounds is a major part of deciding if this is the right way for you to source an automobile. A low bid on a crappy car has the potential to leave you stranded on the side of the road, so if you aren’t a savvy DIY wrencher, you’d better have one hell of a trustworthy mechanic.
It is strongly recommended that you attend the open houses/inspections that are scheduled prior to sale. The bidder is invited, urged, and cautioned to inspect the property prior to submitting a bid. Failure to inspect property shall not constitute cause for cancellation of sale. Property will be available for inspection only at the times specified.  At their own expense, potential bidders may have property inspectors examine the property during regularly scheduled open houses.
As an auctioneer I can tell you from a lot of experience that everybody on this site should be looking for and attending local auctions. The people who make a living buy at our auctions and resaleing on ebay or other means is truely amazing. One retired person built a 20 by 30 shed and did a garage sale ones a month and never did less then a $1000 and many time he told me he made 2 to 3 thousand on one day a month. He would purchase the piles of stuff we could not sale and sort through it and clean it up. We have purchase almost all of our furniture at auctions and most of it people who come over think it is brand new. Furniture is not selling very well because young people go to walmart or other stores and pay full price.
No, I was not referencing salvage auctions. Local auto auctions are extremely tricky, and I would never recommend them as a thrift-shopping device to anyone by an expert. I work for several dealerships, and each and everyone one sends cars to auctions ONLY if they think they would do the dealerships’ reputation harm. I’m glad you think you got a great deal and I really hope you’re one of the exceptions, but I would proceed very carefully with the new car, and I would take it to the best mechanic you can find immediately.
Every day, almost hundreds of government auction happening in every corner of the country. In these seized auctions the value of property will be as low as ninety percent off its bazaar value. The majority of banks and government organizations don't want to hold the property with them for long as they're going to pay on the upkeep of the house, so that their area unit favors to sell it as shortly as possible at extra low-cost costs at these appropriated property auctions. There's no drawback in locating wherever these type of auctions happening in your vicinity. It will be simply set wherever the area unit they command and what is available to them. Nearly all of them are published in newspaper or in television. You can also search the internet the government auctions held near your area or in your city and other relevant information such as time, date and the items being auctioned.
US government car auctions offer cars at great prices. The most imperative thing, which you should be aware of, is the timings of these local vehicle auctions. Apart from that, the other two things, which should be on your checklist, include: Vehicle Identification Number (VIN #) of the vehicle for running through the CAFEX website to acquire its past history and the warranty periods associated with it. Again, you should remember that these cars are to be brought at the least possible price. So, you should avoid bidding high even if the pair of wheels is too attractive to miss out.
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Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 

But that doesn’t mean there still aren’t good deals to be had at local auctions, because as intimidating as it may sound, there’s a reason dedicated bidders still show up to these things every week. You just have to remain skeptical and attentive if you want to take home the right ride, because you never know what might show up, and by using these 10 tips, you might land a gem.
The Department of the Treasury has designated CWS Asset Management & Sales (CWSAMS) as the prime contractor responsible for the maintenance and sale of seized and forfeited real property throughout the U.S. Our website is incorporated into the official Treasury site, http://www.treasury.gov/auctions/. CWS is not affiliated with any other auction information services, seminars, or publications, and we never charge a fee to access these auction listings.
GovDeals is the official portal to government auctions, which range from land to computers to cars. The site's categories include surplus and confiscated items from various government agencies. The rules and regulations vary depending on the participating agency, and you deal directly with the agency after you are awarded your bid. The deals are great, but be sure to inquire about packaging and shipping of an item before you place your bid because most sellers do not ship, pack or palletize. You may be responsible for picking it up or paying someone to transport it.
I returned home wishing I had never gone to this auction, because as someone trying to get over his junky-vehicle hoarding tendencies, I’m not strong enough to handle this kind of temptation. Sure, many of these cars were junk, but they were dirt cheap. And since most were impounded for some sort of driving infraction, there’s a decent chance they move under their own power.
I used to work with a guy whose hobby was buying cars at the Repo Depot. He and a friend would split the cost and the friend, who was a mechanic, would fix what needed fixing. My co-worker, who was a very meticulous guy, liked detailing vehicles — it would be sparkling inside when he finished. Then they’d sell the car through a want ad and make a decent sum.

Agree with you. One bidder can not win an auction, because it is equal to the starting price. That’s why the cars must be posted to such auctions which has more potential clients or even partners. Car-Liquidation is an Auto Auction Association who helps sellers to gather bidders from all over the USA. So if one bidder will be from one state, from the other state will for sure appear another one. Because they have 1000s of auction partners and they share the sellers cars between them. So an auction car will be sold faster.
Visit websites of government agencies that hold public auctions. At the federal level, you can find auctions online or listings for live auctions held across the country by visiting the GovSales.gov website. GovSales.gov has consolidated listings of assets for sale across the federal government. A variety of state and local government agencies also hold public surplus property auctions. Links to many local government auction sites are listed at USA.gov, under Shopping.
You can find some information online, on government websites which will let you search your area for a particular vehicle. These sites are not limited to cars, either. You can find SUVs, trucks and motorcycles on many of them too. Doing a ZIP code search and choosing a specific model will show you all the vehicles within a certain distance from you. Police specific auctions can be found by other websites like gov-auctions, which tells you when and where the local auctions will take place.
Remember, you aren’t allowed to drive these vehicles, but you are granted access to them prior to the auction, and getting up close can reveal all kinds of hidden maladies. Look for things like paint overspray, uneven sheet metal, compromised suspension components, undercarriage rust, and anything else that looks out of place. Interior aroma is another major thing to watch out for, so be wary of things like gasoline aromas and mildew, because even though they may dissipate eventually, there’s a strong chance they represent a much larger issue.

If a dealership sends a car to auction, it’s because they decided the necessary repairs needed to make it “dealer-standard” were too expensive-often the car will looks outstanding and pass a visual inspection, and then when you get it home, you’ll find out it had a bent frame or some other major repair which can make the car quite dangerous. Dealers are in the business of making money, and if they think the car wasn’t good enough to sell, why on earth would you think it was a good bet? There’s a reason these cars go for half price at auction.


"There are two types of public auctions," explains Steven Lang, who runs a used car dealership in the Atlanta area and once owned a dealer auction (not open to the public). "There are government auctions and there are public auctions." Both are full of potential pitfalls. Here's a quick rundown on both and 10 tips for getting the most out of either. That is, if you dare to venture into the auction pit.

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Do the homework, sometimes even ‘bad’ car can be a great deal at an auction. I recently bought a minivan that was listed as having a blown transmission. A little research discovered this is a common problem for that make and year. At the preview, I had my mechanic (whom I trust) on speed dial and got an estimate on the spot to replace the transmission with a new, 5-year warrentied rebuilt one. The bids on the van were low (who’d buy a vehicle with a bad transmission?), and even with the purchase price, the cost of the new transmission and towing to my mechanic, it still came in way below KBB value. And I know it has a worry-free transmission for the next 5 years. So don’t let even a ‘problem’ car scare you off if you’re willing to do the homework and hassle of getting it fixed.
K – Your assertions may be true for your stores, but that is not the case for the bulk of vehicles at auction. Many dealerships will send off brand trade ins to the auction (ex: Chevrolet dealer takes a Ford in on trade). Additionally dealerships will often “turn” their inventory sometime between 60-120 days. If they’ve purchased a car and it’s not moving many dealers will move it to get their cash back out of the car and put it back into another car that they might be able to retail, and make a profit on.
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