The majority of the vehicles found at local auctions will need some work done to them in order to be deemed “road-worthy.” Knowing this before you ever set foot on the grounds is a major part of deciding if this is the right way for you to source an automobile. A low bid on a crappy car has the potential to leave you stranded on the side of the road, so if you aren’t a savvy DIY wrencher, you’d better have one hell of a trustworthy mechanic.
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 Our 1st sale today is  ESS @ 9:30 AM at 1204 28th St. Grand Rapids, MI  We then proced to ESS @ 10:30 AM at 4438 Spartan Industrial Grandville. Next is ESS @ 1:00 PM at 3512 Martin Luther King Blvd. Lansing, MI  After Lansing is Mt. Clemens & then Shelby MI .GO TO our Web Page www.tateauctioneers.com click HOME Page for all Auctions Listings, the click MONTHLY Auction Tab for this month's up-coming Auction Sales.The goods to be Sold are...


Another problem that you might face with local police auctions is finding information related to their occurrence. You can find the information on websites that deals particularly in government auctions. After acquiring the information of its timings, you need to call the local police department, and register your bidder number. Bids only from registered bidders are considered in these seized car auctions. It is advisable to obtain Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) prior to bidding for the car and run it through the Carfax website. It helps in checking the past history and allows you to buy a clean car.
Always take a photo of the vehicle identification number (VIN) toward the base of the windshield on cars you want to bid on at auctions. After that, walk around and check places like door jams, under the hood, and inside trunk lids, where stickers with this number may also appear. If the numbers don’t match up, or are missing entirely it’s best to move on, because there’s probably a really bad reason why it’s like that.
Remember, you aren’t allowed to drive these vehicles, but you are granted access to them prior to the auction, and getting up close can reveal all kinds of hidden maladies. Look for things like paint overspray, uneven sheet metal, compromised suspension components, undercarriage rust, and anything else that looks out of place. Interior aroma is another major thing to watch out for, so be wary of things like gasoline aromas and mildew, because even though they may dissipate eventually, there’s a strong chance they represent a much larger issue.
Do the homework, sometimes even ‘bad’ car can be a great deal at an auction. I recently bought a minivan that was listed as having a blown transmission. A little research discovered this is a common problem for that make and year. At the preview, I had my mechanic (whom I trust) on speed dial and got an estimate on the spot to replace the transmission with a new, 5-year warrentied rebuilt one. The bids on the van were low (who’d buy a vehicle with a bad transmission?), and even with the purchase price, the cost of the new transmission and towing to my mechanic, it still came in way below KBB value. And I know it has a worry-free transmission for the next 5 years. So don’t let even a ‘problem’ car scare you off if you’re willing to do the homework and hassle of getting it fixed.
I returned home wishing I had never gone to this auction, because as someone trying to get over his junky-vehicle hoarding tendencies, I’m not strong enough to handle this kind of temptation. Sure, many of these cars were junk, but they were dirt cheap. And since most were impounded for some sort of driving infraction, there’s a decent chance they move under their own power.
Locating your nearest public car auction locations might be a question of doing some real detective work. They are usually hidden away in web searches because they are unaware of search engine optimization keywords which can get them onto the front page. You can try a search at specific sites which you know to be for repo, government car sales or police auctions. You will have to register your interest prior to the sale and you will be given a bidder number. All auctions work on similar principles, but each have their own way of doing things. You may also be asked for other personal details and will have to show proof of ID when you attend. Do some investigating before you attend. They may be able to send you an information pack and will usually have some tips for first time attendees.
Inspect the items - Before you bid on anything, carefully inspect all of the items first. You would also like to get a better idea of what the items you will be bidding on could be worth. In case you are bidding on an online auction, you will need to rely on the picture and the description of the item. You need to do all of your research in advance, as all of the sales at the police auction are final once they accepted you bid. By doing your research in advance you will ensure that you are buying real bargains and not overpaying for the items that you are bidding on.
Easy Payment: Pay manually or use Auto Pay! Manual payment allows you to choose which card you want to use on every transaction. Auto Pay is set up through your account details. By keeping a valid payment method on file, your auctions will be processed automatically so that you never miss a payment! Special discounts are available to customers choosing Auto Pay.
But ordinary folk typically don’t have the means to attend high-end events like these, so we have to settle for the local auction block, with all of its police impounded “perp-mobiles,” abandoned clunkers, and donated jalopies. But regardless of what kind of crap is being auctioned off, there are diamonds in the rough that can be unearthed, and as a bidder, you stand a chance of getting one for pennies on the dollar.
Closing is usually required within 30 calendar days of sale or sooner. Only the seller may, at its discretion, exceed closing beyond 30 calendar days. Payment in full is due at Closing.  Closing costs, including and without limitation, transfer taxes, documentary stamps, recording fees, and escrow fees will be paid by the Buyer and Seller in accordance with the customs of the county in which the property is located, unless stated otherwise in the individual Terms and Conditions of Sale.

You will be required to bring all of your paperwork (Bill of Sale/Receipt and Dealers License, if needed), Identification, and gate fee of $30 to your assigned pickup date and time.  Important note: If you are sending someone else to pick up your vehicle (including a shipping company), you must call Corona’s Auto Parts and Towing to inform them of who will be picking up the vehicle, and you must send a notarized letter of authorization that the individual picking up the vehicle must have with him/her upon pickup.


ONLINE ONLY GALLERY AUCTION Vintage & Modern Die Cast Toy Collection Bidding is open now Bidding Starts Ending Wednesday, March 13th 7:00 pm CentralTo Enter Auction Click Here! THIS ONLINE ONLY AUCTION Held at our auction gallery 421 E Stevenson Rd Ottawa IL 61350 Preview at the gallery Wednesday March 13th 10:00 am-4:00 pm Pick up dates Thursday   [ View Full Listing ] 
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